Author: Film Quarterly

Fall 2018: Volume 72, Number 1

FROM THE EDITOR
A Deer in the Headlights
B. Ruby Rich
FEATURES
The Handmaid’s Tale as Ustopian Allegory: “Stars and Stripes Forever, Baby”
Heather Hendershot

The Time is Now: Pressure, Guerrilla, and the (Re)Invention of Black British Cinema and History
James S. Williams

Decolonizing Documentary On-Screen and Off: Sensory Ethnography and the Aesthetics of Accountability
Faye Ginsburg

INTERVIEWS
The Landscape of Futurelessness: An Interview with Brett Story
Scott MacDonald

COLUMNS
The Vulnerable Spectator |”It was the Seventies”
Amelie Hastie

Screenings | Letter from Peru: Teen Telenovela, Popular Comedy, Auteur Cinema
Paul Julian Smith

Elsewhere | A Tale of Two Arabias
Bilal Qureshi

FESTIVAL REPORTS
Emotional Images, Immersive Realities: The Fortieth Cinéma du Réel
Clarence Tsui

Love: The Eleventh Annual Orphan Film Symposium
Liz Czach

Of World Wars and Cold Wars and Hollywood Classics

Over the past few years “Page Views” has become a space for FQ to highlight some of the most compelling new scholarship in the field of film and media studies. In collaboration with university presses and scholars, “Page Views” provides a dynamic showcase for critical texts and allows authors the opportunity to think through the impact of their works on the crossover audience that remains a hallmark of FQ’s readership. This column marks the first time that Associate Editor Regina Longo interviews two authors of two books written specifically for the crossover audience. Noah Isenberg discusses We’ll Always Have Casablanca: The Life, Legend, and Afterlife of Hollywood’s Most Beloved Movie and Glenn Frankel talks about High Noon: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic.

Film & Media in a Time of Repression: Practices & Aesthetics of Resistance

On December 13, 2016, a month after the presidential election, Film Quarterly organized an emergency panel with the sponsorship of the Film Society of Lincoln Center. Staged amid the political aftershocks, the event at the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center’s Amphitheater brought together eight panelists from wildly divergent arenas to engage a rapt audience with its central theme: “Film & Media in A Time of Repression: Practices and Aesthetics of Resistance.”

Queering the Globe

FQ Associate Editor Regina Longo talks with Rosalind Galt and Karl Schoonover about their book Queer Cinema in the World. From the introductory pages the co-authors plot a course for their readers by mapping the themes they will address throughout the book: counterpublics, covert and overt identities, and the legibility of sexuality and politics across and between different (social, political, economic, national, regional, linguistic) cultures and different cinematic cultures.

The Battle of Algiers at Fifty

The fiftieth anniversary of the release of The Battle of Algiers (Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966) offers an occasion to challenge commonplaces about the film and to show that there remains much to be clarified about its character. Typically discussed in terms of its debt to Italian neorealism, The Battle of Algiers can also be related to Italian colonial cinema made during the fascist period. The film recounts the genesis of the Algerian nation, but it is at the same time a film about the end of the French empire. Meanwhile, an analysis of location in the film’s little-discussed coda shows The Battle of Algiers to be the first in a long line of banlieue cinema—that is, it is a film that presciently anticipates postcolonial conditions on the territory of France itself.

Film Criticism in the Era of Algorithms

FQ Editor-in-Chief B. Ruby Rich’s survey of the Winter 2016 issue. Her roadmap for navigating the ideas, authors, films, TV shows, and interviews featured within; a reflection on the state of film and media criticism, the beginning of awards season, and special tributes to Vertamae Smart-Grosvenor and Curtis Hanson.