Author: Film Quarterly

The Resilient Spring of Arab Cinema, Ten Years After: An Introduction

In late 2020, during the dark days of pandemic lockdown and a global universe plunged into a shared crisis devoid of unanimity, the subject of impending anniversaries arose. It was then, in a gesture of optimism for an unknown future, that the idea was hatched for an FQ dossier dedicated to the then-impending ten-year mark to commemorate the 2011 uprisings known as the Arab Spring.

The Wiles of Spring

The Arab Spring, the wave of popular insurgencies that spread in that region between 2010 and 2012, springs from a solid history of large-scale political mobilizations that coalesced outside (and sometimes against) the framework of such established and enshrined political organizations as political parties and unions.

Webinar: Reconsidering Binge-Watching in the Age of Covid-19

On November 3rd, Film Quarterly Editor-in-Chief B. Ruby Rich moderated a discussion of the changing conception of binge-watching during the Covid-19 pandemic with Neta Alexander (Colgate University), Tanya Horeck (Anglia Ruskin University), Tina Kendall (Anglia Ruskin University), and Kartik Nair (Temple University), whose special focus on binge-watching appears in the Fall 2021 issue of Film Quarterly.

Cinematic TV: A Conversation with Rashna Wadia Richards

Much has been said about serial dramas such as The Sopranos (HBO, 1999–2007), The Wire (HBO, 2002–8), Mad Men (AMC, 2007–15), and Breaking Bad (AMC, 2008–13) bringing about a new golden age of television. A lot of these discussions, however, have centered on the idea that quality television has become more cinematic than ever—a modifier that implies a superiority of cinema and a teleological linearity toward a particular aesthetic. Notwithstanding the overuse of the term and its implications, there is no consensus about what exactly “cinematic” means in these contexts.

Tearing, Stitching, Quilting: The Abolition Poetics of Garrett Bradley

A young black woman dressed to signal a 1920s time frame walks along an empty country road, holding an umbrella. She stops in front of a white man sitting beneath a large tree, slowly kneels in front of him, and removes her hat. We see a close-up of his hand before shifting to hers. She begins ripping his white robe, a garment unambiguously suggestive of a Ku Klux Klan costume.