Author: Film Quarterly

Conversation and Duration in Eduardo Coutinho’s Films

I am not interested in the short take. I want the temporal dimension of things.—Eduardo Coutinho

Dossier co-editor (and FQ Contributing Editor) Natalia Brizuela takes up the much-debated theme of conversation in the films of Eduardo Coutinho, and juxtaposes the conversational to the questions of temporality and duration that occur across Coutinho’s entire body of work.

An Introduction to Coutinho

FQ Editor-in-Chief B. Ruby Rich and guest issue editor Natalia Brizuela introduce FQ’s dossier on the work of Brazilian filmmaker Eduardo Coutinho, who died unexpectedly in 2014. Eduardo Coutinho, the greatest documentary filmmaker in the last half-century of Brazilian cinema, is woefully underrecognized in the United States and has not been adequately incorporated into the global history of documentary cinema. This dossier aims to open up conversations about the work of Coutinho in Anglophone cinema studies, and to encourage more scholarship on the subject.

Evidence of Visibility

“People need a screen.” With those words, author/activist Naomi Klein galvanized the room at the CBC Glenn Gould Theatre, where a daylong documentary discussion was held in September in conjunction with the Toronto International Film Festival [see “Toronto Turns Forty” in this issue]../

The Digital, The Virtual, and The Possible: Riffing with Homay King on Virtual Memory

Homay King’s book, her second, is the kind that warrants more than one reading. But there is no awkward or dense prose, often a hallmark of theoretical texts that turn reading into an academic exercise. King talks with FQ Associate Editor Regina Longo about the process of writing this book, and her new research interests. Read the column then download the free chapter from the book chosen for FQ readers.

The “Trivialist Cinema” of Roy Andersson: An Interview

FQ Contributing Editor Megan Ratner interviews filmmaker Roy Andersson. Swedish writer-director Roy Andersson explores human behavior and its consequences. His Living Trilogy of films, begun in 2000, takes stock of what it means to be a human being. In each Living Trilogy installment, brief but complete scenes pose questions about awareness, responsibility, and the weight of history in contemporary life. Despite his dense material, Andersson’s touch is light, the occasionally farcical tone sympathetically mordant. Sharply lampooning society’s rules, expectations, and institutions, Andersson reserves his benevolence for flops and lost causes.

New Visions, Old Crises

Documentary has been in the grip of a shape-shifting transformation, thanks to shifts in technologies, genre, journalism, and the status of evidence and veracity. Not since the 1980s—when the invention of camcorders, VHS tape, and VCR machines, alongside the debut of cable television, fueled the last great upheaval—has the field been so explosively inventive and destabilized