All posts tagged: Archives

Jonathan Demme ( 1944-2017)

Jonathan Demme’s death has moved the film world. Jonathan Demme was a founding member of a cinematic generation. He started out with Roger Corman, then left Hollywood to go back East and hung his shingle in New York city at the exact moment when the independent film movement began. Never an intellectual or theorist of his own work, he could be scorned as cinema-lite, yet the eulogies piling up reveal how universally beloved he was. FQ has always paid attention to Demme. Here are two articles from the FQ archives to mark his passing.

Skirts and Pants and Everything In Between: Laura Horak on Girls Will Be Boys

Laura Horak’s first monograph, Girls Will Be Boys: Cross-Dressed Women, Lesbians, and American Cinema, 1908–1934, is refreshing and invigorating. In a moment when pop culture is ablaze with stories of the “novelty” of transgender and gender nonconforming people, FQ Associate editor Regina Longo was delighted to sink into a thoroughly researched book on this subject that was ten years in the making. Read the column and then download the free chapter of the book offered here for FQ readers.

Chance Meetings and Metrics, with More to Come

FQ Editor-in-Chief B. Ruby Rich’s quarterly roundup of the issue: Winter 2014, Volume 68, Number 2. She recounts her chance meeting at the Toronto Film Festival with celebrated director Zhang Yimou, the IDA convening with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in LA, which she attended, and what the new industry buzzword— “metrics”—portends for the field.

The H-Man vs Liquid Human

I remember seeing The H-ManThe H-Man on television one late evening in early adolescence; it was a silly specimen of an already cheesy 1950s genre, the “made in Japan” sci-fi/horror film . . . But a DVD explosion has caused The H-Man to mutate into a beautiful and genuinely harrowing new form:

The Avant-Garde Archive Online

The Internet may have finally delivered avant-garde filmmakers the audience they always claimed they wanted. With experimentation rejected by the moving-image industry, and moving image shunned by commercial art galleries until the 1970s, film and video artists in the twentieth century relied on film festivals, grassroots film clubs, artist-run co-operatives, and art school curricula as channels of distribution.