All posts tagged: B Ruby Rich

PAGE VIEWS LIVE: A Conversation with Rashna Wadia Richards

Film Quarterly’s webinar series showcasing the best in recent film and media studies publications continued on September 24th with a conversation between Page Views editor Bruno Guaraná (Boston University) and Rashna Wadia Richards (Rhodes College) about her new book, Cinematic TV: Serial Drama Goes to the Movies (Oxford University Press, 2021), introduced by FQ editor-in-chief B. Ruby Rich.

Stuttering Cinema, Stuttering Democracy, Stuttering Globalism

As the year 2021 crept along, it became increasingly schizophrenic. Emerging from pandemic lockdowns was euphoric—until news of the redubbed Delta variant began to dash hope and cause doubt or panic. Still, theaters announced their reopenings and cinephiles flocked, some nervously, some exuberantly. The Pacific Film Archive, profiled in this issue, set September 1 as its indoor reopening date.

PAGE VIEWS LIVE: A Conversation with Philip Scepanski

Film Quarterly’s webinar series showcasing the best in recent film and media studies publications continued on June 22nd with a conversation between Page Views editor Bruno Guaraná and Philip Scepanski (Marist College) about his new book Tragedy Plus Time: National Trauma and Television Comedy (University of Texas Press, 2021), introduced by FQ editor-in-chief B. Ruby Rich.

Theater Openings and Vaccinated Viewings in Pandemic Year Two

It has been more than a year since this editorial space filled with speculations about streaming films and the closing of theaters. It was with distinct excitement, then, that I began to read the reopening announcements. The beloved Paris Theater in New York City, with its lease now held by Netflix and with programming selected by former Museum of the Moving Image curator David Schwartz, trumpeted an Al Pacino retrospective. The Film Forum, that mainstay of downtown New York tastemaking, announced its theater’s reopening while retaining its virtual marquee, too.

Zoom Out: The Melancholic Screens of 2020

Over the first months of the pandemic, the internet filled with streaming playlists, Zoom masterpieces, and classic revivals. The litany of canceled or virtual film festivals had become the new normal, with everything from SXSW to Cannes to Telluride called off or moved entirely online, and then evolving into hybrids or customized drive-ins.

Webinar: In Conversation–B.Ruby Rich, Kass Banning, Warren Crichlow, and Isaac Julien

On the occasion of the exhibition of Isaac Julien‘s celebrated 10 screen installation, Lessons of the Hour, Film Quarterly collaborated with the McEvoy Foundation for the Arts on a webinar to mark this meditation on Frederick Douglass and his times. On October 28th, FQ editor B. Ruby Rich moderated a discussion of Julien’s genre-breaking and immersive moving-image practice with the artist himself as well as with professors Kass Banning (University of Toronto) and Warren Crichlow (York University, Toronto), authors of the first major study of the exhibition, “A Grand Panorama: Isaac Julien, Frederick Douglass, and Lessons of the Hour,” (FQ 73.4).

The Screening Life, Once Removed

This editorial was written on the Fourth of July, that annual orgy of barbecues and tin-hat patriotism made worse this year by the unprecedented arrival in US cities of bomb-grade fireworks—explosives that shook the ground, sending dogs cowering and possibly softening up the urban population for a battlefield future. This appears, however, in the FQ issue emerging just prior to the 2020 US presidential election, an event destined to change the future of this country and the world and, yes, the film and TV world, in ways that are equally unpredictable, confusing, and terrifying.

When Is an Editorial Not an Editorial? The Covid-19 (Quarantine, Era 1) Edition

There is no such thing as business as usual now. And most certainly, no film as usual: every festival canceled, every movie theater dark, as the names of the closures and cancellations bring sadness and grief for curators and filmmakers, film critics and distributors, cinema owners and workers, film studies professors and students, and, yes, their audiences—all, of course, as of print time.