All posts tagged: Book Reviews

Queering the Globe

FQ Associate Editor Regina Longo talks with Rosalind Galt and Karl Schoonover about their book Queer Cinema in the World. From the introductory pages the co-authors plot a course for their readers by mapping the themes they will address throughout the book: counterpublics, covert and overt identities, and the legibility of sexuality and politics across and between different (social, political, economic, national, regional, linguistic) cultures and different cinematic cultures.

Reconsidering John Frankenheimer

Each of the books under review assures us that Frankenheimer’s The Manchurian Candidate (1962), which had been withdrawn from circulation sometime after the J. F. Kennedy assassination, was first re-exhibited at a special screening at the New York Film Festival in 1987, a screening which in Stephen Armstrong’s words “eventually prompted United Artists to give the film a second theatrical release”.

Myths, Mothers, and Monoliths

National identity is predicated, in part, on the intentional forgetting or remembering of historical events, and cinema plays a role in these processes. In The Afterlife of America’s War in Vietnam, Gordon Arnold traces the many incarnations of the war in American popular culture, deftly demonstrating that retellings of the conflict are often intertwined with political rhetoric.