All posts tagged: Bruno Guarana

Page Views Live: A Conversation with Lynn Spigel

Film Quarterly’s original webinar series showcasing the best in recent film and media studies publications continued on October 21st with a conversation between Page Views editor Bruno Guaraná (Boston University) and Lynn Spigel (Northwestern) about her new book, TV Snapshots: An Archive of Everyday Life (Duke University Press, 2022). Moderated by FQ editor-in-chief B. Ruby Rich.

headshots of Lindsey Green-Simms, Bruno Guarana, and B. Ruby Rich

PAGE VIEWS LIVE: A Conversation with Lindsey Green-Simms

Film Quarterly’s original webinar series showcasing the best in recent film and media studies publications continued on July 6th with a conversation between Page Views editor Bruno Guaraná (Boston University) and Lindsey Green-Simms (American University) about her new book, Queer African Cinemas (Duke University Press, 2022). Moderated by FQ editor-in-chief B. Ruby Rich.

Queer African Cinemas: A Conversation with Lindsey B. Green-Simms

The first romantic sequence in Rafiki, by the Kenyan director Wanuri Kahiu, opens with a close-up of a pair of sneaker-clad feet on a skateboard, its wheels thumping along the asphalt. The feet belong to the teenage Makena, who arrives at her friend Ziki’s apartment building to take her out around town for the day. After Ziki’s mother answers the door, an elliptical cut thrusts the viewer into a montage sequence in which the two teenage girls sit close together on a tuk-tuk ride around the streets of Nairobi.

PAGE VIEWS LIVE: A Conversation with Ross Melnick

Film Quarterly’s webinar series showcasing the best in recent film and media studies publications continued on April 22nd with a conversation between Page Views editor Bruno Guaraná (Boston University) and Ross Melnick (University of California Santa Barbara) about his new book Hollywood’s Embassies: How Movie Theaters Projected Power Around the World (Columbia University Press, 2022), introduced by FQ editor-in-chief B. Ruby Rich.

Hollywood’s Embassies: A Conversation with Ross Melnick

You may have seen Nicole Kidman last September, in a commercial for AMC theaters, stepping into an empty movie theater. “We come to this place for magic,” she says in voice-over, inviting patrons back into movie theaters after the hiatus forced by the worldwide spread of COVID-19. Pitching a return to normalcy while also emphasizing the theater’s cleanliness, safety, and, yes, magic, the commercial is also symptomatic of a delicate moment for movie exhibition.

PAGE VIEWS LIVE: A Conversation with Rashna Wadia Richards

Film Quarterly’s webinar series showcasing the best in recent film and media studies publications continued on September 24th with a conversation between Page Views editor Bruno Guaraná (Boston University) and Rashna Wadia Richards (Rhodes College) about her new book, Cinematic TV: Serial Drama Goes to the Movies (Oxford University Press, 2021), introduced by FQ editor-in-chief B. Ruby Rich.

Cinematic TV: A Conversation with Rashna Wadia Richards

Much has been said about serial dramas such as The Sopranos (HBO, 1999–2007), The Wire (HBO, 2002–8), Mad Men (AMC, 2007–15), and Breaking Bad (AMC, 2008–13) bringing about a new golden age of television. A lot of these discussions, however, have centered on the idea that quality television has become more cinematic than ever—a modifier that implies a superiority of cinema and a teleological linearity toward a particular aesthetic. Notwithstanding the overuse of the term and its implications, there is no consensus about what exactly “cinematic” means in these contexts.