All posts tagged: Film Exhibition

PAGE VIEWS LIVE: A Conversation with Ross Melnick

Film Quarterly’s webinar series showcasing the best in recent film and media studies publications continued on April 22nd with a conversation between Page Views editor Bruno Guaraná (Boston University) and Ross Melnick (University of California Santa Barbara) about his new book Hollywood’s Embassies: How Movie Theaters Projected Power Around the World (Columbia University Press, 2022), introduced by FQ editor-in-chief B. Ruby Rich.

Webinar: Film Culture – the Legacy of the Pacific Film Archive and Non-Profit Exhibition

On December 2nd, Film Quarterly marked the fiftieth anniversary of the Pacific Film Archive (now officially known as BAMPFA) with a webinar discussion of the PFA’s invaluable role in cultivating film culture that expands upon the Special Focus in FQ’s Fall 2021 issue.  FQ Editor in chief B. Ruby Rich moderated a conversation with Kathy Geritz (BAMPFA), Josslyn Luckett (Film Quarterly), Cornelius Moore (California Newsreel), Rajendra Roy (MoMA), and David Schwartz (Netflix).

Paris in the Dark: A Conversation with Eric Smoodin

If you had happened to attend the December 8, 1929, screening of Fox Movietone Follies (David Butler and Marcel Silver, 1929) at the opening of the Moulin Rouge cinema in Paris, you would certainly remember the raucous audience that surrounded you. If reports are to be believed, you might have been among the patrons outraged by the poorly written French subtitles—“deplorable” French, really. You may have joined others that night or the following weekend in vandalizing chairs and throwing pieces of furniture at the screen, with shouts of “Shut up” or “In French!” But maybe you were there for a romantic rendezvous, in which case the film and the music and the subtitles mattered a lot less than having your evening marred by unhappy, snobbish viewers. Whatever the hypothetical situation, imagining yourself as a willing participant in Parisian film culture from the era of early sound cinema to around 1950 is nearly inevitable while reading Eric Smoodin’s Paris in the Dark: Going to the Movies in the City of Light, 1930–1950.