All posts tagged: Regina Longo

Turning Sixty

B. Ruby Rich From Film Quarterly Summer 2018, Volume 71, Number 4 Turning sixty is a landmark. No, not mine: it is Film Quarterly that this year marks its ripe old age and can reassert its claim as the oldest continuing film journal in the United States. Thanks to its dedicated contributors, staff, editorial boards, and, of course, the University of California Press, its publisher and steward, FQ remains young and vital even today, alive and kicking, and, I’d like to think, better than ever. Anniversary celebrations kicked off in Toronto in March, where the annual Society for Cinema and Media Studies (SCMS) conference offered an occasion for the FQ reception at SoHo House. The gathering was a wonderful mix of Toronto locals, FQ contributors and masthead notables, Criterion moguls, UC Press staff, and a kinship network of FQ friends and family. A slideshow of Film Quarterly through the ages was assembled and presented by FQ editorial assistant, Marc Francis. A first run of postcards drawn from four different editorial eras (Ernest Callenbach, Ann Martin, …

Skirts and Pants and Everything In Between: Laura Horak on Girls Will Be Boys

Laura Horak’s first monograph, Girls Will Be Boys: Cross-Dressed Women, Lesbians, and American Cinema, 1908–1934, is refreshing and invigorating. In a moment when pop culture is ablaze with stories of the “novelty” of transgender and gender nonconforming people, FQ Associate editor Regina Longo was delighted to sink into a thoroughly researched book on this subject that was ten years in the making. Read the column and then download the free chapter of the book offered here for FQ readers.

An Interview with Anton Kaes, Nicholas Baer, and Michael Cowan on The Promise of Cinema

FQ Associate Editor Regina Longo interviews film scholars and theorists Anton Kaes, Nicholas Baer, and Michael Cowan on their latest labor of love. The Promise of Cinema is an extraordinary anthology of primary source texts of German-language film theory, originally published between 1907 and 1933, with well over 250 carefully curated texts appearing for the first time in English-language translation. Read the column then read selects from the anthology chosen by its editors for FQ’s readers.

The Digital, The Virtual, and The Possible: Riffing with Homay King on Virtual Memory

Homay King’s book, her second, is the kind that warrants more than one reading. But there is no awkward or dense prose, often a hallmark of theoretical texts that turn reading into an academic exercise. King talks with FQ Associate Editor Regina Longo about the process of writing this book, and her new research interests. Read the column then download the free chapter from the book chosen for FQ readers.

Bernie Cook Reflects on Katrina Media at the Ten-Year Mark in Flood of Images: Media, Memory, and Hurricane Katrina

FQ Associate Editor Regina Longo met with Bernie Cook in Washington, DC to speak about his book Flood of Images: Media, Memory, and Hurricane Katrina. The book’s publication marks the 10-year anniversary of the storm and its aftermath. As a native of New Orleans and a media scholar, Cook approaches the subject as both an insider and an outsider. Read the column and then download the free chapter of the book offered here for FQ readers, with special thanks to UT Press.

Historian Cara Caddoo Discusses Envisioning Freedom: Cinema and the Building of Modern Black Life

When FQ Associate Editor Regina Longo interviewed Cara Caddoo for this column, they talked about the current state of racial politics in the United States. Despite the long road ahead and the critical, collective work that must be done to achieve equality, historians like Cara Caddoo are bringing to the surface narratives that will become part of a larger conversation of the history of race and media in the US. Read the column and a selected excerpt from Chapter 3: “Colored Theaters in the Jim Crow City.”

A Conversation with Eric Smoodin and Jon Lewis on The American Film History Reader

Eric Smoodin and Jon Lewis first met on a college campus as film studies graduate students in 1979. When the opportunity arose to talk to them about their latest collaboration, FQ Associate Editor Regina Longo welcomed the chance to learn about the process behind putting together an anthology that is very likely to become a staple in college classrooms. Read the column, then download the Introduction to the book to learn more about the editors’ motivations for this anthology.

Kristen Whissel Talks about Spectacular Digital Effects: CGI and Contemporary Cinema

Kristen Whissel’s latest book, Spectacular Digital Effects: CGI and Contemporary Cinema, examines the relationship between narrative and spectacle in contemporary blockbuster cinema. Whissel is no stranger to this terrain. She has been deepening her theories of spectacular narrativity since she began publishing on the subject of early cinema and the American experience of technological modernity. Read the column and then download the free chapter of the book offered here for FQ readers.