All posts filed under: Page Views

Imagining Hollywood from the Outside In: A Conversation with Celestino Deleyto

It is not uncommon for me to pick up a book—any kind of book—and as I begin to read it, to make mental notes of elements of the story or facts that intersect with my own experiences. I am certain that I am not alone in this practice of suturing myself into these written realms. Film scholars have been developing multiple theories regarding notions of subject formation ever since Jacques Lacan first developed the concept in the 1950s–60s. From Daniel Dayan and Pierre Oudart to Jacques Alain-Miller to Christian Metz to Stephen Heath to Laura Mulvey to Kaja Silverman, despite this post-post–ad infinitum structural moment, debates on the logic of the signifier persist in film and media studies.

Of World Wars and Cold Wars and Hollywood Classics

Over the past few years “Page Views” has become a space for FQ to highlight some of the most compelling new scholarship in the field of film and media studies. In collaboration with university presses and scholars, “Page Views” provides a dynamic showcase for critical texts and allows authors the opportunity to think through the impact of their works on the crossover audience that remains a hallmark of FQ’s readership. This column marks the first time that Associate Editor Regina Longo interviews two authors of two books written specifically for the crossover audience. Noah Isenberg discusses We’ll Always Have Casablanca: The Life, Legend, and Afterlife of Hollywood’s Most Beloved Movie and Glenn Frankel talks about High Noon: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic.

Queering the Globe

FQ Associate Editor Regina Longo talks with Rosalind Galt and Karl Schoonover about their book Queer Cinema in the World. From the introductory pages the co-authors plot a course for their readers by mapping the themes they will address throughout the book: counterpublics, covert and overt identities, and the legibility of sexuality and politics across and between different (social, political, economic, national, regional, linguistic) cultures and different cinematic cultures.

A Conversation with Michael Boyce Gillespie on Film Blackness and the Idea of Black Film

FQ Associate Editor interviews film scholar Michael Boyce Gillespie on his new book Film Blackness and the Idea of Black Film. Gillespie begins his book with a series of questions that seem to be posed to reader and author alike, for he declares that this book is “driven by the belief that the idea of black film is always a question, never an answer,” and pushes the reader to think through some of the past and present iterations of blackness in American culture and media. Gillespie shows that there have always been multiple ways of being black, becoming black, performing blackness, challenging blackness, embodying blackness, defying blackness, and transcending the conventional understanding of blackness. Read the column then download a selection from the book made available thanks to Duke University Press.

Skirts and Pants and Everything In Between: Laura Horak on Girls Will Be Boys

Laura Horak’s first monograph, Girls Will Be Boys: Cross-Dressed Women, Lesbians, and American Cinema, 1908–1934, is refreshing and invigorating. In a moment when pop culture is ablaze with stories of the “novelty” of transgender and gender nonconforming people, FQ Associate editor Regina Longo was delighted to sink into a thoroughly researched book on this subject that was ten years in the making. Read the column and then download the free chapter of the book offered here for FQ readers.

An Interview with Anton Kaes, Nicholas Baer, and Michael Cowan on The Promise of Cinema

FQ Associate Editor Regina Longo interviews film scholars and theorists Anton Kaes, Nicholas Baer, and Michael Cowan on their latest labor of love. The Promise of Cinema is an extraordinary anthology of primary source texts of German-language film theory, originally published between 1907 and 1933, with well over 250 carefully curated texts appearing for the first time in English-language translation. Read the column then read selects from the anthology chosen by its editors for FQ’s readers.

The Digital, The Virtual, and The Possible: Riffing with Homay King on Virtual Memory

Homay King’s book, her second, is the kind that warrants more than one reading. But there is no awkward or dense prose, often a hallmark of theoretical texts that turn reading into an academic exercise. King talks with FQ Associate Editor Regina Longo about the process of writing this book, and her new research interests. Read the column then download the free chapter from the book chosen for FQ readers.

Bernie Cook Reflects on Katrina Media at the Ten-Year Mark in Flood of Images: Media, Memory, and Hurricane Katrina

FQ Associate Editor Regina Longo met with Bernie Cook in Washington, DC to speak about his book Flood of Images: Media, Memory, and Hurricane Katrina. The book’s publication marks the 10-year anniversary of the storm and its aftermath. As a native of New Orleans and a media scholar, Cook approaches the subject as both an insider and an outsider. Read the column and then download the free chapter of the book offered here for FQ readers, with special thanks to UT Press.

Historian Cara Caddoo Discusses Envisioning Freedom: Cinema and the Building of Modern Black Life

When FQ Associate Editor Regina Longo interviewed Cara Caddoo for this column, they talked about the current state of racial politics in the United States. Despite the long road ahead and the critical, collective work that must be done to achieve equality, historians like Cara Caddoo are bringing to the surface narratives that will become part of a larger conversation of the history of race and media in the US. Read the column and a selected excerpt from Chapter 3: “Colored Theaters in the Jim Crow City.”

A Conversation with Eric Smoodin and Jon Lewis on The American Film History Reader

Eric Smoodin and Jon Lewis first met on a college campus as film studies graduate students in 1979. When the opportunity arose to talk to them about their latest collaboration, FQ Associate Editor Regina Longo welcomed the chance to learn about the process behind putting together an anthology that is very likely to become a staple in college classrooms. Read the column, then download the Introduction to the book to learn more about the editors’ motivations for this anthology.